WGMU Exclusive: Opioid Crisis Symposium

On April 19, a slew of researchers, scholars, and politicians visited George Mason University to propose solutions toward ending the opioid crisis in Northern Virginia.


By: Jackie Reed

FAIRFAX, VA – On April 19, a slew of researchers, scholars, and politicians visited George Mason University to propose solutions toward ending the opioid crisis in Northern Virginia. At 8:15 a.m., panelists, researchers, and politicians gathered in Dewberry Hall to begin the all-day symposium.

Opening the dialogue was William Hazel, senior advisor for strategic initiatives and policy at Mason. As former Virginia Secretary for Health and Human Resources, Hazel is greatly familiar with initiatives that fight against the opioid crisis. First speaker after Hazel’s introduction was David Wu, the university’s provost and executive vice president. Wu emphasized Mason’s commitment to developing “trans-disciplinary research” – starting at the collegiate level can have an impact on public health issues today.

After Wu’s introduction, governor of Virginia Ralph Northam presented his call to action to eradicate such an epidemic, by defining it as the “largest challenge” Virginia faces today. He stated, “we lost 1,227 – 1,227 Virginians to opioid overdoses in 2017. And I would like to tell you that the numbers are going down but they are not.”

As a governor and a physician, Northam explains how attainable narcotics are, whether prescribed or sold otherwise. “Access to heroin is not difficult in this day and age, and as you know, that heroin is now often laced with either fentanyl or par fentanyl, which is about 100 times as potent than fentanyl,” Northam said. Once consumers have access to these drugs, even after one use, they can become addicted.

According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), “roughly 21 to 29 percent of patients prescribed opioids for chronic pain misuse them.” Wilson Compton, deputy director of NIDA, considers the market increase of drug usage and exposure as “an extraordinary situation.” Compton noted, “Dr. Hazel and the governor reminded us that this did start with over-prescribing. That was the spark that started this fire – through a really well-intentioned desire – treat pain more effectively. That is our goal. We need to make sure that we do a good job of taking care of patients with pain.” Because of the easy access and prone nature to drug addiction, physicians and pharmacists have an integral role in educating patients and preventing misuse of such prescriptions.

Prevention, acute management, and general management are the main takeaways from the symposium. Programs hoping to eradicate the epidemic require innovation, collaboration among several perspectives, and dissemination of backed and current statistics.

Feature Photo By (Sasha Toophanie/WGMU).

WGMU Exclusive: Patriot Activities Council (PAC)

By: Christian Hernandez

WGMU’s Christian Hernandez hosts an interview with Regine Victoria, director of programming for GMU’s Patriot Activities Council (PAC).

PAC hosts a variety of events and programming. Their active student leadership team works to lift spirits and bring the Mason community together.

More information can be found at si.gmu.edu/pac/.

Feature Photo By (GMU Student Involvement/Official Website).

WGMU Exclusive: Alpha Phi Omega

By: Robert McGreevy

WGMU’s Robert McGreevy hosts Kevin Embrey, member of GMU’s Alpha Phi Omega.

Alpha Phi Omega is an inclusive, co-ed fraternity that promotes leadership, fellowship, friendship, and service.

More information can be found at https://www.facebook.com/apogmu/.

Feature Photo By (Alpha Phi Omega/Facebook).

WGMU Exclusive: Society of Professional Journalists

By: Josh Biedrycki

WGMU’s Josh Biedrycki hosts an interview with Lauryn Cantrell, president of GMU’s Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ).

The GMU chapter organizes industry events that connects students to media professionals who work in broadcasting, journalism, and media news outlets. Such opportunities offer insight into the media field through networking, socials with other campus SPJ chapters, conferences, and workshops.

More information can be found at gmuspj.blogspot.com/?m=1.

Feature Photo By (GMU SPJ/Facebook).

WGMU Exclusive: Patriot Pantry

By: Quianna Marissa

WGMU’s Quianna Marissa hosts an interview with Gary Hooker, Director of George Mason University’s Patriot Pantry.

Founded in December 2014, GMU’s Patriot Pantry (originally called the Pop-Up Pantry) is housed under GMU’s Student Support and Advocacy Center (SSAC). Mainly run by volunteers, they provide access to food items, toiletries, and school supplies to in-need students. The office strives to educate the Mason population about food insecurity and homelessness.

More information can be found at ssac.gmu.edu/patriot-pantry/.

Feature Photo By (GMU Patriot Pantry/Facebook).

WGMU Hiring For 2018-2019 Academic Year

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Join the Team!

WGMU Radio is hiring paid and volunteer executive/general staff positions for the upcoming 2018-2019 academic year. The station is looking to fill six positions.  The list of the six positions are below.  To view the job description, click on the title.

Music Director/Assistant Program Director

Independent/Local Music Director

Sports Media/Sports Programming Director

Marketing Director

Production Director

Director of Engineering (Chief Audio Engineer)

 

QUALIFICATIONS: Must be an enrolled Mason student for the upcoming year. Must maintain a 2.5 GPA and be familiar with WGMU.

TO APPLY: All interested job applicants should submit a completed WGMU Employment Application and your current resume with a cover letter (references are preferred)  to WGMU General Manager to Sasha Toophanie, WGMU General Manager by email: stoophan@gmu.edu with your name and the position title in the subject line.

Download the job application here: WGMU EMPLOYMENT APPLICATION

The deadline for submissions is Monday, April 9, 2018 at 5pm.

WGMU Radio is an employer of equal opportunity. All genders, races and orientations are encouraged to apply.

The Megaphone Podcast: Igor Stojanov

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Photo By (David Carroll/Office of Student Media).

On this week’s episode of The Megaphone Podcast, WGMU’s Jackie Reed interviews Igor Stojanov, host of The Megaphone Podcast and visiting journalist from Macedonia, reflecting on his experience as a media fellow with the Office of Student Media. Listen here:

The Megaphone Podcast: Manfred Veizaga

20171019_151553-1On this week’s episode of the Megaphone Podcast, Igor interviews Manfred Veizaga, of MCN and the Society of Professional Journalists, about what it’s like to be a student journalist, as well as how to balance journalism with student life. Listen here:

The Megaphone Podcast: David Carroll

20171019_132637On this week’s episode of The Megaphone Podcast, Igor interviews David Carroll, the Associate Director of Student Media at George Mason University. They discuss his role, how Student Media operates, and the role of student leadership within Student Media as an organization. Give it a listen!

 

 

 

MSNBC’s Chris Matthews Talks #RealNews At Mason

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Host of MSNBC’s Hardball Chris Matthews opens up this year’s Mason Communication Forum. Photo By (Kaitlyn Koegler/Office of Student Media).

On Tuesday, October 24, host of MSNBC’s Hardball Chris Matthews opened this year’s Mason Communication Forum with a conversation addressing “fake news” and journalism today.

The conference, named #RealNews2017, was an interactive event that enabled students to exchange insight about today’s “social-mediated world”, first illustrated by Matthews. Though “fake news” has become a hot topic circulating throughout social media platforms, news outlets, and even in 3 a.m. tweets, it is not a new concept. It has always been here.

Today, consumer-run, unedited content initiatives contribute to the disparity among opinions and a misinformed populous. Driving unfiltered ideas and revealing raw content is an unprofessional yet tempting move, all of which can lead to deviance away from the truth. And that is what makes up the role of a journalist today. They strive to repair consensus, expose the absolutes, and inform the public with honesty and clarity.

According to Matthews, there are three rules to journalism. One, is to peer-review and edit. “This is what separates journalists from B.S.”, Matthews said. Second, is to embrace diversity. Viewpoints are no longer linear, and tending to multiple audiences should be made a priority by professionals entering the journalistic field. Last, is “to have to want to make it.” Quality writers attain a passion driven by the truth.

Following Matthews’ keynote address was a panel discussion and speed table sessions from distinguished media professionals. His introduction set a foundation that continued the on-going conversation of what journalism is now. Modern coverage means unveiling the truth, checking the facts, remaining honest, and tuning out outside forces which populate the inter-web today.

Video coverage brought to you by Mason Cable Network: https://youtu.be/pmD61iMYTbM

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