Aaron Carter On-Air Interview with Jesse Robinson

Check out Jesse Robinson’s interview with re-emerging music artist Aaron Carter, who will be performing live in the DMV area this Sunday with a show at The Fillmore in Silver Spring at 7:30 PM. Tune in to “The Jesse Robinson Show” every Wednesday Night this semester from 7-9 PM on WGMU Radio! 




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Moon Hooch Live In-Studio Performance and Interview w/ Alex Green

Have a listen to the very original group “Moon Hooch” play a song live in our WGMU Radio Studio, followed by a brief interview with “Greenhouse Effect” host DJ Alex Green. Stay tuned for more live interviews later in the semester. Enjoy!




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Album Review: Drake – Nothing Was the Same

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Drake

 

Nothing Was the Same

 

OVO Sound, Republic Records, September 24 2013

 
 
 
 

Reviewed by Ben Simpson

There is a large collection of artists that don’t think Aubrey Drake Graham deserves the recognition he has received. Common referred to him as “soft”. DMX, Li’l Kim, and Chris Brown had much more explicit ways to describe the 26-year-old Canadian rapper. But despite the hate, Drake finds himself right back at the top after his latest release Nothing Was the Same. “This is nothing for the radio, but they’ll still play it though/Cause it’s that new Drizzy Drake, that’s just the way it go.” Just like the words above, taken off of the opening track “Tuscan Leather“, Drake can make an album virtually without any sing-along hooks and still somehow find his way into millions of homes, cars, and smartphones. In a year where Kanye’s Yeezus weirded us out, and Jay-Z’s Magna Carta… Holy Grail talked down to us, Drake once again squeezed his way to the top of the heap with his most marketable asset: relating to his audience. Coming from a middle-class television-star life, his background is nothing like Jay-Z’s drug-slinging street years,  yet Drake shares the issues of the majority. He wants to be successful (clearly he has achieved that with the millions of record sales), he works hard (Drake famously hates vacations), and he just wants to be loved (as evident by the bazillion songs about women). Parents aren’t scared off by him, heck even Ellen has had him on her show plenty of times. “Degenerates, but even Ellen loves our s***” as “Tuscan Leather” puts it. But there is a dark side to Drake, and it seems to come out in this album. 2011’s Take Care was the type of album you would party to, his debut album Thank Me Later in 2010 was a typical self-hyping introduction album, but Nothing Was the Same is something else entirely.

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Erik Griffin “Workaholics” Interview on “The Jesse Robinson Show”

Actor and comedian Erik Griffin (Comedy Central’s “Workaholics”) calls in to a special mid-day edition of “The Jesse Robinson Show” to talk the 4th season of the comedy series, and his upcoming show at the Jammin’ Java on September 18th! Be sure to check it out and hear more entertainment guests by tuning in every Wednesday from 7-9 PM for “The Jesse Robinson Show” on WGMU! 

Album Review: MGMT – MGMT

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MGMT

 

MGMT (self-titled)

 

Columbia, September 17 2013

 
 
 
 

Reviewed by Jon Howard

After taking the radio by storm in early 2008 with their inarguably catchy synthpop singles “Time to Pretend”, “Electric Feel”, and “Kids”, MGMT faced a tough decision.  Should they produce more radio-friendly synthpop and be lumped in with such bands as Passion Pit and Phoenix, or develop the more experimental, psychedelic sound found elsewhere on their debut album Oracular Spectacular.  Their sophomore album Congratulations was confirmation that the band had chosen the latter route, and as a result was and still is extremely polarizing among the band’s fanbase.  Now with the release of their third, self-titled album, MGMT has all but confirmed that they are strictly a psychedelic act now.  If you fell in love with MGMT for their radio singles, turn around now.  This album has nothing to offer you.  If you fell in love with the psychedelic surf rock of Congratulations, however, then MGMT will certainly not disappoint.

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Album Review: Arctic Monkeys – AM

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Arctic Monkeys

 

AM

 

Domino, September 10 2013

 
 
 
 
 

Reviewed by Jon Howard

With four number one albums in the United Kingdom and a rapidly growing fanbase across the pond here in the United States, Arctic Monkeys are under more pressure than ever to continue delivering fresh, well written music with their latest album, simply titled AM. While Arctic Monkeys have always tweaked their musical style between releases, AM often feels like a fair bit more of a departure from their previous work than we’ve become accustomed to. Lead singer Alex Turner has stated in many interviews that AM would draw influence from hip hop, in particular Dr. Dre and Outkast. While the music on the album is still very distinctly Arctic Monkeys, the band’s experimentation with hip hop becomes very clear through Matt Helder’s drumming, such as on the heavy pounding opening track and lead single “Do I Wanna Know?”

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Concert: Frightened Rabbit

By Ben Simpson

They may not have the mainstream audience locked down yet, but judging from the rabid sold-out crowd at DC’s 9:30 Club, Frightened Rabbit will never have to worry about filling up a venue for the rest of their careers. Smack dab in the middle of their tour supporting their latest effort, their 4th studio album Pedestrian Verse (released on February 5th on Atlantic Records), the five-piece Scottish-folk-infused group conquered the crowd with high energy ballads and the same unique sound that has followed them throughout their 10-year run.

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Album Review: Tyler, the Creator – Wolf

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Tyler, the Creator

 

Wolf

 

Odd Future, April 2 2013

 
 
 
 
 

Reviewed by Jon Howard

Tyler, the Creator has always been known for his shock-value lyrics, dark themes, and tight production, and with 2011’s Goblin all three of these elements reached their apex. Tyler had long stated that his next planned album Wolf would move away from the violent themes of Bastard and Goblin and be far mellower album.  In fact, ‘mellow’ would probably be the best way to sum the album up as a whole in one word.  The harsh beats and violent lyrics of previous tracks like “Yonkers” and “Tron Cat” are all but absent on Wolf, appearing only in a few tracks over the album’s 70 minute span. Rather, Wolf hides Tyler’s deeply rooted issues behind a mask of smooth, Summery music.

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Album Review: The Strokes – Comedown Machine

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The Strokes

 

Comedown Machine

 

RCA Records, March 26 2013

 
 
 
 
 
 

Reviewed by Greg Grunzel (DJ Baby Duck)

One thing is for certain: Jules loves the 80’s. Proverbial kings of the 00’s garage rock revival scene, The Strokes’ latest effort Comedown Machine bleeds 80’s more than Eddie Murphy’s bright red leather Delirious jumpsuit (humorous side note: the minimalist album art coincidentally is the same color). They are proud to announce it, too, by naming the almost-title-track 80’s Comedown Machine, a slow, dreamy croon along the lines of Call Me Back and Ask Me Anything from the previous two releases. The very Aha-esque One Way Trigger epitomizes the new sound and takes it to the extreme. Highlights (and potential future singles) include the danceable Welcome to Japan, and the currently-stuck-in-my-head Happy Ending. They even get weird and throw in the slow, sounds-like-its-played-through-a-trasistor-radio, almost-bossa nova Call it Fate, Call it Karma to close the album. To sum it up, if you’re a fan of The Strokes and even slightly enjoyed 80’s new wave (a la Talking Heads) like I am/did, there isn’t a skippable track on here. But if you’re looking for Is This It, this isn’t it.

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Tom O’Connor Interview

Tom O’Connor joined Steve Kolbe on WGMU Radio, part of the GoMason Digital Network, at Halftime during Mason’s CBI game Monday night and they had a chance to discuss Mason’s move from the CAA to the A-10.

 




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